Alien, stranger, colonist – is multiculturalism really that bad?

How are ethnic societies supposed to win the battle for being treated with equal rights if even educational authorities have their contribution towards negative perception of diversity?

“Alien”, “stranger”, “colonist”, “documented alien” are only a few examples of synonyms for word “immigrant” suggested by two highly popular online dictionaries – Collins and Thesaurus.com. It is disgraceful how far they are from being objectively constructed or referring to common, valid observations. In my perception they impose inferiority, indicate lack of cultural or societal affinity and separateness from the citizens of host country, which are views not supported by verifiable source. Similar, omnipresent findings represent a broader problem with supporting unfavourable voices of Ed Milliband’s party and UKIP without having informed reason for doing so.

Migrants who have brought along economy boost and wage growth, as well as their strong cultural identity and skillfulness should be recognised for their contribution to the overall country development, advancement in numbers of  high-skill workers, rather than treated with prejudice on every corner.

Immigrants no longer belong to the minority groups in UK – according to ONS statistics, 1 in 8 of UK residents is foreign-born, which makes up to 8 million ethnic citizens.

Such a powerful and substantial group of residents can not be ignored and its merits understated.

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Alien, stranger, colonist – is multiculturalism really that bad?
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How are ethnic societies supposed to win the battle for being treated with equal rights if even educational authorities have their contribution towards negative perception of diversity?
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