Are political parties serious about engaging with the UK diverse population?

As the political debate heats up and the strong multicultural community gets ignored, we have to ask if political parties are about engaging with a growing ethnic population (estimated to be 20%).

Are political parties listening or serious about dealing with the issues ethnic communities face such as (representation, health, taxation, pension, integration)

A quick research of how the main political parties done in the past decade shows that the conservative party has increased the number of ethnic MPs within the party from 2 to 11, which represents 41% of ethnic MPs in the HOC. The conservatives have been nominating ethnic MPS in safer seats, which shows their true commitment to making a difference. The ethnic population’s strong values (families, business enterprise, faith) resonate more with conservative traditions than with the Labour party.

The number of MPs in the 2010 elections was 27 (12 more than the previous parliament) but still equates to 4.2% of the number of MPs in the house.

  • In the Scotland and Welsh assembly there were 2 MP’s each which equates to 1.6%, and 3.3% respectively
  • Representation on local UK councils stands at 4%
  • 6% of civil servants are ethnic and 5% of the police, with the highest representation in Met Police at 10.5%, West Midlands, BTP & Leicestershire. The number drops at high ranks to 3.3%
  • Teaching staff stands at 6.2%
  • In Armed Forces ethnic staff stands at 7.1% but drops to 2.4% at officer ranks
  • NHS staff shows that 41% of hospital & Community Service doctors are from ethnic minority & 20% of all qualified nurses
  • National fire & rescue staff is 3.8%

 

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Are political parties serious about engaging with the UK diverse population?
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As the political debate heats up and the strong multicultural community gets ignored, we have to ask if political parties are about engaging with a growing ethnic population (estimated to be 20%).
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